Viewer Discretion Advised

The weather has been crazy up here in New Hampshire.  One day last week everything had to stop for a snow storm, and the next day Spring seemed to arrive.  Because of the snow day, what was supposed to be three successive sessions with Becky as our model were interrupted, and as a result, many fine artworks have gone unfinished.  Quelle tragique!  (Obviously I am referring to the fine artworks in progress by my cohorts, as well as my own.)  Here are my almost-finished works from Friday and Tuesday.

Becky on the Green Chair

Becky on the Green Chair

This one may be finished.  I need a critique from Peter to be sure.  Since I was working on a 9×12 support, the face was quite small, which frustrated me because it was really beautiful.  I decided to quit the one above and start up a portrait, which was going to be finished the next Friday, weather permitting.  Which it didn’t.

Half-finished portrait of Becky

Half-finished portrait of Becky

And no Sunday sessions, possibly due to a mix up involving Daylight Savings Time.  But I still have extra material to show you this week, thanks to the Saturday Life Group.  Two Saturdays’ worth, in fact.  Not only two Saturdays, but two models on one day–a rare event!  But so hard for us as artists to pull off.

I’ll start with the earlier Saturday.  Pretty normal stuff, not shooting for the moon, just charcoal on the Mi Tientes pastel paper.  I don’t care for that exaggerated texture but I have a lot of it to use up, and it might be growing on me.

Becky, left side view

Becky, left side view

Becky, right side view--another imitation of Ingres' Grande Odalisque

Becky, right side view–another imitation of Ingres’ Grande Odalisque (see my prior discussion here)

Becky, front view

Becky, front view

For the second Saturday, we had two models, both new to us, a couple.  We found that posing them in a tableau where they seemed to be interacting with each other made for better results.  Here is our first longish (20 minutes) pose.

Duo Jamie and Catherine, No. 1, 20 minutes

Duo Jamie and Catherine, No. 1, 20 minutes

The second pose was our longest, about 45 minutes I believe, and as you will see, the models were side by side but not really interacting.

Duo Jamie and Catherine--No. 2, 45 minutes

Duo Jamie and Catherine–No. 2, 45 minutes

We had intended that second pose to last the rest of our session, but as a group, we were so disappointed by it, that we abandoned it for another intertwined pose.  However, I did enjoy my drawing, which was basically just of the guy, with the girl in the background.  The light was interesting.  (That studio at the Institute has an overhead skylight, which distinguishes our Saturday drawings from all others in the Langer Place studio.)

Duo Jamie and Catherine--No. 3, 25 minutes

Duo Jamie and Catherine–No. 3, 25 minutes

It was hard to account for all the limbs and still keep their positions believable.  When a body disappears behind something, it has to come out the other side looking as if it belonged there.  If you examine my drawings closely, you can find much fault, but overall, the effect is pleasing, I hope.

Aline Lotter is currently exhibiting:

at the Hatfield Gallery in Manchester (Langer Place, 55 S. Commercial St., Manchester, NH); at the Bartlett Inn in Bartlett; at the Red Jacket Inn in North Conway;  at her law offices at 41 Brook St in Manchester; and at her studio by appointment.

Through March 29, you can also view (and purchase–of course!) my 6×6’s at the Artstream Gallery in Rochester, NH.

2 responses to “Viewer Discretion Advised

  1. Agree, dual model sessions where the models interact make for a much more meaningful session vs. two individuals modeling in close proximity. I recently attended a dual model session and had to leave after moving around the room because the pose wouldn’t change, very frustrating as there was no interaction and they were far apart.

    Always admire your use of light and shading, even your short poses exhibit a certain grace. Well done.

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